IsilonSD – Part 5: Monitoring Activity

For my deployment of IsilonSD Edge, I want to keep this running in my lab, installing systems is often far easier than operating them (especially troubleshooting issues). However an idle system isn’t really a good way to get exposure, so I need to put a little activity on this cluster, plus monitor it.

This post is part of a series covering the EMC Free and Frictionless software products.
Go to the first post for a table of contents.

This is just my lab, so here is my approach to doing more with IsilonSD than simply deploying it:

  • Deploy InsightIQ (EMC’s dedicated Isilon monitoring suite)
  • Move InsightIQ Data to IsilonSD Edge Cluster
  • Synchronize Software Repository
  • Mount Isilon01 as vSphere Datastore
  • Load Test

Deploy InsightIQ

InsightIQ is EMC’s custom-built monitoring application for Isilon. Personally, this was one of the top reasons I select Isilon years ago when evaluating NAS solutions. I’m a firm believer that the ability to monitor a solution should be a key deciding factor in product selection.

Without going too deep in InsightIQ itself (that’s another blog), it provides the ability to monitor the performance of the Isilon, including the client perspective of the performance. You can drill into the latency of operations by IP address; which when I first purchased an Isilon array is was because the incumbent solution was having numerous performance problems and the lack of visibility into why was causing a severe customer satisfaction issue.

InsightIQ monitors the nodes, cluster communication, and even does file analysis to help administrators understand where their space is consumed and by what type of files.

Deploying InsightIQ is a typical OVA process, we’ve collected the information necessary in previous posts, so I’ll be brief, in fact you can probably wing-it on this one if you want.

*Note there is no sound, this is to follow along the steps.
  1. In the vSphere Web Client, deploy an OVA
  2. Provide the networking information and datastore for the InsightIQ appliance
  3. After the OVA deploy is complete, open the console to the VM, where you’ll need to enter the root password
  4. Navigate your browser to the IP address you entered, logging in as root, with the password you created in the console
  5. Add the Isilon cluster to InsightIQ and wait while it discovers all the nodes.

 

Move InsightIQ Data to IsilonSD Edge Cluster

You can imagine collecting performance data, and file statistics will consume quite a bit of storage. By default InsightIQ will store all this data on the virtual machine, so I move the InsightIQ Datastore onto the Isilon cluster itself. While this is a little circular, InsightIQ will generate some load writing the monitoring data, which in turn will give it something to monitor, for our lab purposes this provides some activity.

Simply log into InsightIQ, under Settings -> Datastore, change the location to NFS Mounted Datastore. By default Isilon shares out /IFS, however in production this should ALWAYS be changed, but for a lab we’ll leverage the export path.

IsilonSD_InsightIQDSMove

If you do this immediately after deploying InsightIQ, it will be very quick. If, however, you’ve been collecting data, you’ll be presented with information about the progress of the migration, refreshing the browser will provide updates.

IsilonSD_InsightIQDSMoveProgressSynchronize Software Repository

I have all my ISO files, keys, OVAs and software installation on a physical NAS; this makes it very easy to mount via NFS to all my hosts as a datastore, physical and nested; for quickly installing software in my lab. Because of this, I use this repository daily; so to ensure I’m actually utilizing IsilonSD to continue to learn about it post setup, I’m going use IsilonSD to keep a copy of this software repository, mounting all my nested ESXi hosts to it.

I still need my physical NAS for my physical hosts, in case I lose the IsilonSD I don’t want to lose all my software and be unable to reinstall. I want the physical NAS and IsilonSD to stay in sync too. My simple solution is to leverage robocopy to sync the two file systems; the added benefit of this is I also get the regular load on IsilonSD.

Delving into robocopy is a whole different post, but here is my incredibly simple batch routine. It mirrors my primary NAS software repository to the Isilon. This runs nightly now.

:START
robocopy \\nas\software\ \\isilon01\ifs\software\ /MIR /MT:64 /R:0 /W:0 /ZB
GOTO START

Upon first execution, I see in InsightIQ traffic onto IsilonSD. Even though this is nested ESXi, with the virtual Isilon nodes sharing both compute, network, memory and disk; I see a fairly healthy external throughput rate, peaking around 100Mb/s.

IsilonSD_InsightIQRobocopyThroughput

 

When the copy process is complete, looking in the OneFS administrator console will show the data has been spread across the nodes (under HDD Used).

IsilonSD_HDDLoaded

Mount Isilon01 as vSphere Datastore

Generally speaking, I would not recommend Isilon for VMware storage. Isilon is built for file services, and its specialty is sequential access workloads. For small workloads, if you have an Isilon for file services already, an Isilon datastore will work; but there are better solutions for vSphere data stores in my opinion.

For my uses in the lab though, with my software repository being replicated onto Isilon, mounting an Isilon NFS export as a datastore will not only allow me to access those ISO files but open multiple concurrent connections to monitor.

*Note there is no sound, this is to follow along the steps.
Mounting an NFS datastore to Isilon is exactly the same as any other NFS NAS.

You MUST use the FQDN to allow SmartConnect to balance the connections.

 

With the datastore mounted, if you go back into the OneFS administrator console; you can see the connections were spread across the nodes.

IsilonSD_ConnectionSpread

Now I have a purpose to regularly use my IsilonSD Edge cluster, keeping it around for upgrade testing, referencing while talking to others, etc. Again, with the EMC Free and Frictionless license, I’m not going to run out of time, I can keep using this.

Load Test

Even though I have an ongoing use for IsilonSD, I want to to a little more to do than just serve as a software share, just to ensure it’s really working well. So I’ll use IOMeter to put a little load on it.
I’m running IsilonSD Edge on 4 nested ESXi virtual machines, which in turn are all running on one physical host. So IsilonSD is sharing compute, memory, disk and network across the 4 IsilonSD nodes (plus I have dozens of other servers running on this host). Needless to say, this is not going handle a high amount of load, nor provide the lowest latency. So, while I’m going to use IOMeter to put some load on my new IsilonSD Edge cluster and typically I would record all the details of a performance test; this time I’m not. Especially given I’m generating load from virtual machines on the same host.

Given Isilon is running on x86 servers, it would be incredibly interesting to see a scientific comparison between physical Isilon and IsilonSD Edge with like-for-like hardware. In my personal experience with virtualization, there is a negligible overhead, but I have to wonder the difference Infiniband makes.

In this case, my point of load testing is not to ascertain the latency or IOPS, but merely to put the storage device under some stress for a couple of hours to ensure it’s stable. So I created a little load, peaking around 80Mbps and 150 IOPS, but running for about 17 hours (overnight).

Below are some excerpts from InsightIQ, happily the next morning the cluster was running fine, even given the load. During the test, the latency fluctuated widely (as you’d expect due to the level of contention my nested environment creates). From an end user perspective, it was still usable.

IsilonSD_LoadTest1IsilonSD_LoadTest2IsilonSD_LoadTest3IsilonSD_LoadTest4

In my next post I’m going to wrap this up and share my thoughts on IsilonSD Edge.